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Nerve Conduction Study (NCS)
 
 
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Nerve conduction studies (NCS) measure how well and how fast the nerves can send electrical signals. Measuring the electrical activity in muscles and nerves can help find diseases that damage muscle tissue (such as muscular dystrophy) or nerves (such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or peripheral neuropathies). EMG and nerve conduction studies are often done together to give more complete information.

Nerve conduction studies are done to:

  • Find damage to the peripheral nervous system, which includes all the nerves that lead away from the brain and spinal cord and the smaller nerves that branch out from those nerves. Nerve conduction studies are often used to help find nerve disorders, such as carpal tunnel syndrome or Guillain-Barré syndrome.
  • Find damage to the peripheral nervous system, which includes all the nerves that lead away from the brain and spinal cord and the smaller nerves that branch out from those nerves. Nerve conduction studies are often used to help find nerve disorders, such as carpal tunnel syndrome or Guillain-Barré syndrome.

 Preparing for this procedure  

Prepare for your test as instructed. Shower or bathe, but don't use powder, oil, or lotion. Your skin should be clean and free of excess oil. Wear loose clothes. But know that you may be asked to change into a hospital gown. The entire test will take about 60 minutes. Be sure to allow extra time to check in.

Additional instructions may be provided by your doctor.


How this procedure is performed

In this test, several flat metal disc electrodes are attached to your skin with tape or a special paste. A shock-emitting electrode is placed directlyover the nerve and a recording electrode is placed over the muscles under control of that nerve. Several quick electrical pulses are given to the nerve, and the time it takes for the muscle to contract in response to the electrical pulse is recorded. The speed of the response is called the conduction velocity.

The same nerves on the other side of the body may be studied for comparison. When the test is completed, the electrodes are removed.

Nerve conduction studies are done before an EMG if both tests are being done. Nerve conduction tests may take from 15 minutes to 1 hour or more, depending on how many nerves and muscles are studied. 


CPG Physicians who perform this procedure 

Sameh Morris Rizkalla, MD